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Negative coverage on steroids: Trump’s victory lap angers the media

President Trump, as always, has an uncanny knack for giving his journalistic detractors plenty of ammunition.

But man, much of the media are acting like it’s a national tragedy that an ailing president was released from the hospital.

My eyeballs are hurting from watching all the negative coverage.

MSNBC’s Joy Reid called Trump’s appearance on the Truman Balcony a “Mussolini moment.”

CNN’s David Gergen, usually the most mild-mannered of men, said he’s “practically feeling like we’re in the grips of a madman.”

WHITE HOUSE PHYSICIAN SAYS TRUMP ‘MAY NOT ENTIRELY BE OUT OF THE WOODS YET’ IN FIGHT AGAINST CORONAVIRUS

CNN morning host John Berman, when a producer ran B-roll of the Trump balcony appearance, complained: “Take it off, please, don’t even put it on the screen! Please take it off, because that’s gonna kill people.”

I know this sounds insane in the current environment, but shouldn’t the country be pleased that a sick president has improved to the point that he could leave Walter Reed? Couldn’t the pundits at least pay lip service to the notion that this is better than him taking a turn for the worst?

When CNN’s Jim Acosta says on Twitter that Trump is the “Coronavirus-in-Chief,” there really isn’t much attempt to hide the instinctive opposition to him.

And yet Trump hasn’t done much to help himself since he walked out of the hospital, presumably with the backing of the medical team.

The video made by the president was, for starters, all about himself. This, according to several reports, conflicted with his staff’s hope that having the virus would enable him to show some empathy for those who are affected.

Instead he said: “I learned so much about coronavirus. And one thing that’s for certain, don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it. You’re gonna beat it. We have the best medical equipment; we have the best medicines — all developed recently — and you’re gonna beat it.”

He went on to say he feels “better than 20 years ago…Don’t let it take over your lives. Don’t let that happen.” And he again compared it to the flu.

Well, as journalists have pointed out, the average person doesn’t have access to a world-class battalion of doctors and state-of-the-art equipment the way a president does, or have a medical unit in their home. “You’re gonna beat it” must ring hollow to the families of the 210,000 Americans who have died. And the virus can cause long-term damage to some of those who survive. It sounded once again like the president was minimizing Covid-19.

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There was a new line of argument for those who believe Trump and many of his top aides contracted the virus by not wearing masks, not practicing social distancing and attending packed White House events: “I knew there’s danger to it, but I had to do it. I stood out front; I led.”

What drew even more visceral

‘An embarrassment’: Trump tweet angers pandemic survivors

SEATTLE — Dizzy with a soaring fever and unable to breathe, Scott Sedlacek had one thing going for him: He was among the first people to be treated for COVID-19 at Seattle’s Swedish Medical Center, and the doctors and nurses were able to give him plenty of attention.

“I’m so glad that he appears to be doing well, that he has doctors who can give him experimental drugs that aren’t available to the masses,” Sedlacek said. “For the rest of us, who are trying to protect ourselves, that behavior is an embarrassment.”

COVID-19 has infected about 7.5 million Americans, leaving more than 210,000 dead and millions more unemployed, including Sedlacek. The U.S. has less than 5% of the globe’s population but more than 20% of the reported deaths.

Yet the world’s highest-profile coronavirus patient tweeted on Monday, as he was due to be released from the hospital following a three-day stay: “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge. I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

He reiterated the message in a video Monday night, saying “Be careful,” but “don’t let it dominate you.”

“You’re going to beat it,” he said. “We have the best medical equipment, we have the best medicines.”

The advice fit in with Trump’s downplaying of the virus, his ridiculing of those who wear masks to protect themselves and others, and his insistence on holding rallies and White House events in contravention of federal guidelines. But emergency room doctors, public health experts, survivors of the disease and those who have lost loved ones were nevertheless aghast, saying his cavalier words were especially dangerous at a time when infections are on the rise in many places.

Marc Papaj, a Seneca Nation member who lives in Orchard Park, New York, lost his mother, grandmother and aunt to COVID-19. He was finding it tough to follow the president’s advice not to let the virus “dominate your life.”

“The loss of my dearest family members will forever dominate my life in every way for all of my days,” Papaj said, adding this about Trump: “He does not care about any of us — he’s feeling good.”

Dr. Tien Vo, who has administered more than 40,000 coronavirus tests at his clinics in California’s Imperial County, had this to say: “Oh, my Lord. That’s a very bad recommendation from the president.”

The county is a farming region along the Mexican border that, at one point, had California’s highest infection rate. Its 180,000

Trump tweet angers pandemic survivors

SEATTLE (AP) — Dizzy with a soaring fever and unable to breathe, Scott Sedlacek had one thing going for him: He was among the first people to be treated for COVID-19 at Seattle’s Swedish Medical Center, and the doctors and nurses were able to give him plenty of attention.

The 64-year-old recovered after being treated with a bronchial nebulizer in March, but the ensuing months have done little to dull the trauma of his illness. Hearing of President Donald Trump’s advice by Tweet and video on Monday not to fear the disease — as well as the president’s insistence on riding in a motorcade outside Walter Reed Medical Center and returning to the White House while still infectious — enraged him.

“I’m so glad that he appears to be doing well, that he has doctors who can give him experimental drugs that aren’t available to the masses,” Sedlacek said. “For the rest of us, who are trying to protect ourselves, that behavior is an embarrassment.”

COVID-19 has infected about 7.5 million Americans, leaving more than 210,000 dead and millions more unemployed, including Sedlacek. The U.S. has less than 5% of the globe’s population but more than 20% of the reported deaths.

Yet the world’s highest-profile coronavirus patient tweeted on Monday, as he was due to be released from the hospital following a three-day stay: “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge. I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

He reiterated the message in a video Monday night, saying “Be careful,” but “don’t let it dominate you.”


“You’re going to beat it,” he said. “We have the best medical equipment, we have the best medicines.”

The advice fit in with Trump’s downplaying of the virus, his ridiculing of those who wear masks to protect themselves and others, and his insistence on holding rallies and White House events in contravention of federal guidelines. But emergency room doctors, public health experts, survivors of the disease and those who have lost loved ones were nevertheless aghast, saying his cavalier words were especially dangerous at a time when infections are on the rise in many places.

Marc Papaj, a Seneca Nation member who lives in Orchard Park, New York, lost his mother, grandmother and aunt to COVID-19. He was finding it tough to follow the president’s advice not to let the virus “dominate your life.”

“The loss of my dearest family members will forever dominate my life in every way for all of my days,” Papaj said, adding this about Trump: “He does not care about any of us — he’s feeling good.”

Dr. Tien Vo, who has administered more than 40,000 coronavirus tests at his clinics in California’s Imperial County, had this to say: “Oh, my Lord. That’s a very bad recommendation from the president.”

The county is a farming region along the Mexican border that, at one point, had California’s highest infection rate. Its