Showing: 1 - 3 of 3 RESULTS

‘Don’t Be Afraid’ of COVID, Trump Says as He Returns to White House That Is Stalked by Illness | Top News

By Steve Holland and Alexandra Alper

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump told Americans “to get out there” and not fear COVID-19 as he returned to the White House on Monday after a three-night hospital stay to be treated for the virus and removed his white surgical mask to pose for pictures.

Asked how he felt on arrival at the White House, where his staff has been hit by infections and his re-election campaign dogged by the pandemic, Trump said: “Real good,” according to a pool report by a journalist covering his return on behalf of other media.

Trump wore a mask as he left the helicopter that flew him back from a military hospital outside Washington and climbed the stairs of the White House South Portico, where he removed it and posed for pictures, waving, saluting and giving thumbs-up signs.

He then turned to walk into the White House, his mask still in his pocket, TV footage showed.

Trump has played down a disease has killed more than 1 million people worldwide and more than 209,000 in the United States alone – the highest death toll of any country.

The Republican president, running for re-election against Democrat Joe Biden in the Nov. 3 U.S. election, was admitted to the Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday after being diagnosed with the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

“Don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it,” Trump said in a recorded video message. “We’re going back, we’re going back to work. We’re going to be out front. … Don’t let it dominate your lives. Get out there, be careful.”

Shortly after his return, a video with thunderous orchestral music posted to his Twitter handle showed him arriving at the White House and saluting from the South Portico as Marine One flew off. The video was quickly viewed nearly a million times.

Trump has repeatedly flouted social-distancing guidelines meant to curb the virus’ spread. He also mocked Biden at last Tuesday’s presidential debate for wearing a mask at events, even when he is far from others.

While it was unclear if Biden had seen Trump’s latest video, the Democrat, who leads in national opinion polls, stressed the seriousness of the disease and emphasized the importance of wearing masks.

“I would hope the president – having gone through what he went through and I’m glad he seems to be coming along pretty well – would communicate the right lesson to the American people. Masks matter,” Biden told an NBC News town hall in Miami.

Trump, 74, has not had a fever in more than 72 hours and his oxygen levels are normal, his medical team told reporters at the hospital where he was treated. The doctors declined, however, to discuss any toll the disease could have on the president’s lungs or disclose when Trump last tested negative for the coronavirus.

The team added that the president had received supplemental oxygen twice in recent days.

“He may not entirely be out of

COVID-19 ‘IS something to be afraid of’

Amanda Kloots, Nick Cordero and their son, Elvis, at an event for Kloots' fitness brand. <span class="copyright">(Getty Images)</span>
Amanda Kloots, Nick Cordero and their son, Elvis, at an event for Kloots’ fitness brand. (Getty Images)

Fitness instructor Amanda Kloots — who recently lost her husband, Broadway star Nick Cordero, to COVID-19 — had a message for Donald Trump after the president told Americans not to “be afraid” of the deadly illness or “let it dominate your life.”

“To all the over 208,000 Americans who lost loved ones to this virus — I stand by you, with you, holding your hand,” Kloots wrote Tuesday on Instagram. “Unfortunately it did dominate our lives didn’t it? It dominated Nick’s family’s lives and my family’s lives. I guess we ‘let it’ — like it was our choice??”

Tony nominee Cordero, known for his roles in “Bullets Over Broadway,” “Rock of Ages,” “Waitress” and other productions, died in July at age 41 after a long battle with COVID-19 that involved a leg amputation and a medically induced coma, among other complications.

He and Kloots married in September 2017 and shared a 1-year-old son, Elvis. Monday marked three months since Cordero’s death.

“Unfortunately not everyone is lucky enough to spend two days in the hospital,” Kloots continued in her post. “I cried next to my husband for 95 days watching what COVID did to the person I love.”

On Monday night, Trump returned to the White House after receiving treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. The president announced he and First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for the novel coronavirus last week after reports surfaced that one of his top aides, Hope Hicks, had contracted it.

Trump has continued to downplay the dangers of COVID-19, which has infected several other White House figures and taken the lives of more than 210,000 Americans during his presidency.

“It IS something to be afraid of,” Kloots wrote. “After you see the person you love the most die from this disease you would never say what this tweet says. There is no empathy to all the lives lost. He is bragging instead. It is sad. It is hurtful. It is disgraceful.”

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

Source Article

Trump video tells supporters, ‘Don’t be afraid’

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump’s health after his COVID-19 diagnosis and hospitalization, and infections of close aides and others (all times local):

8:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump has tweeted a new video taped after he returned to the White House in which he tells the American public not to be afraid of COVID-19, which has killed more than 200,000 people in the U.S. and more than a million worldwide.

In message that is sure to infuriate medical doctors trying to keep the country safe, Trump says he has “learned so much” about the virus he contracted. And he says: “Don’t let it dominate. Don’t let it take over your lives.”

Trump was treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center by a team of some of the country’s best doctors and he received an experimental drug not readily available to the public.

Nonetheless, he told his followers who do not have access to the same level of care that they had little to fear.

“Don’t be afraid of it,” he said. “You’re going to beat it. We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines.”

Trump also again defended his decision to continue traveling and holding events before he got sick, saying he “knew there’s danger to it, but I had to it. I stood out front. I led.”

__

7 p.m.

President Donald Trump says he feels “good” as he arrives back at the White House after three days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was being treated for COVID-19.

Marine One landed at the White House just before 7 p.m. Monday just as the sun was setting.

He then walked upstairs to the South Portico balcony, took off his mask and stuffed it in his pocket, and flashed a double thumbs-up to the cameras. He saluted as he watched the helicopter lift back off. He walked into the White House without putting his mask back on.

Trump’s doctors said he would continue his recovery from the White House, where he will be cared for 24/7 by a team of doctors and nurses. His doctor says he’s still contagious.

Trump walked out the golden front doors of Walter Reed earlier Monday and offered a thumbs-up and fist bump before he stepped into an SUV that carried him to the helicopter. Lights had been set up to illuminate the scene for cameras.

___

6:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump pumped his fist as he departed a military hospital after a three-day stay for the coronavirus.

A masked Trump walked out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening toward a waiting SUV that carried him to Marine One for the short flight back to the White House. He said, “Thank you very much,” to the assembled reporters.

Even before he walked out the doors, he tweeted that he’d be back on the campaign trail soon.

The 74-year-old Trump was expected to continue his recovery at the White House,