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CDC Study Details ‘Urgent Need’ to Address Coronavirus Spread Among Young Adults | National News

Coronavirus cases among young adults are on the rise, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there is an “urgent need” to address the trend.

In a study released on Friday, the CDC examined 767 hotspot counties identified during June and July and found that increases in the percent of positive tests among people 24 and younger were followed by several weeks of increasing positivity rates in those aged 25 and older. The trend was particularly true in the South and West.

Photos: Daily Life, Disrupted

TOPSHOT - A passenger in an outfit (R) poses for a picture as a security guard wearing a facemask as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 coronavirus stands nearby on a last century-style boat, featuring a theatrical drama set between the 1920s and 1930s in Wuhan, in Chinas central Hubei province on September 27, 2020. (Photo by Hector RETAMAL / AFP) (Photo by HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP via Getty Images)

Making the findings even more concerning is the fact that a jump in the positivity rate of older age groups is “likely to result in more hospitalizations, severe illnesses, and deaths,” according to CDC.

“There is an urgent need to address transmission among young adult populations, especially given recent increases in COVID-19 incidence among young adults,” the study said.

CDC published a separate, small study on Friday that identified common drivers of behavior that might influence risk for COVID-19 exposure among young adults in Wisconsin. The list included: social or peer pressure, perceived severity of disease outcome and exposure to misinformation, conflicting messages or opposing views regarding masks.

During interviews, young adults said they felt social or peer pressure to not wear a mask and reported receiving “negative reactions” or “odd looks” from people while wearing a mask.

The study said the finding “further underscores the importance of providing clear and consistent messages regarding need for and effectiveness of masks.”

Last week, CDC reported that coronavirus infections among young adults jumped from August to September, with the agency concluding that some of the increase was likely due to colleges and universities resuming in-person classes.

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Chris Rock, Colin Jost and Michael Che Address Trump’s Coronavirus Diagnosis During SNL Premiere

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Saturday Night Live was not shy about addressing President Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis.

The SNL cast returned to the studio on Saturday for their first live in-person show since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic in March, with Chris Rock serving as the host and Megan Thee Stallion as the musical guest for the season 46 premiere.

For the cold open, Alec Baldwin played Trump opposite Jim Carrey’s Joe Biden and recreated the first presidential debate, which took place in Cleveland on Tuesday, three days before the commander-in-chief, 74, publicly announced on Twitter that he and his wife, First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for the coronavirus.

“You did take the COVID test you promised you’d take in advance,” asked Beck Bennett, who played moderator Chris Wallace. “Absolutely, scout’s honor,” Baldwin’s Trump replied. Days after the debate, the Fox News host said on air that “there was an honor system when it came to the people that came into the hall from the two campaigns.”

Then in the opening monologue, Rock, 55, kicked off his remarks with Trump’s hospitalization. “Before we get started, the elephant in the room. President Trump is in the hospital from COVID, I just want to say my heart goes out to COVID,” the Fargo actor said.

RELATED: What We Do & Don’t Know Right Now About Donald Trump’s Condition After COVID-19 Infection

And during Weekend Update, Colin Jost and Michael Che started their segment with Trump’s diagnosis. “Well say what you will about 2020 but it’s got moves. This news was a lot for us to process a day before we came back on the air after four months off and it all happened so fast. I woke up yesterday and heard the president had mild symptoms. And then four hours later, he was getting medevaced to a hospital in what looked like the last chopper out of Vietnam,” Jost, 38, said.

“I gotta say it’s a bad sign for America that when Trump said he tested positive for a virus, 60 percent of people were like, ‘prove it.’ And it’s been very weird to see all these people, who clearly hate Trump, come out and say ‘we wish him well.’ I think a lot of them are just guilty that their first wish came true,” he said.

Che, 37, also chimed in and said, “While in the hospital, the president isn’t allowed to see any guests but he is expected to be visited by three ghosts, probably one from his past, one from his — okay this is weird! Because a lot of people on both sides are saying there is nothing funny about Trump being hospitalized with coronavirus even though he mocked the safety precautions for the coronavirus and those people are obviously wrong. There’s a lot funny about this, maybe not from a moral standpoint but mathematically, if you were constructing a joke this is all the ingredients you need. The problem is it’s

City of Hope-led study details new strategy to address the barriers that keep older adults out of clinical trials

The study examined what has been done and chartered a roadmap to improve equitable access using the best-available scientific literature on barriers to older adult participation in cancer clinical trials.

A City of Hope-led study revealed little effort has been made to improve older adult representation in clinical trials of new cancer drugs, even when the treatment is aimed at a disease that disproportionately affects this age group.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201001005384/en/

William Dale, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Cancer and Aging Research at City of Hope, the study’s senior author. Photo: City of Hope

“There is currently no incentive to establish real-world effectiveness among older adults. Older adults need a seat at the table,” said Mina Sedrak, M.D., M.S., lead author of the study and deputy director of the Center for Cancer and Aging at City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.

Two in 5 Americans with cancer are age 70 or older, yet fewer than 25% of patients in cancer clinical trials registered with the Food and Drug Administration are in this age group, Sedrak said.

The study was published in the journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians on Oct. 1. Researchers reviewed 8,691 studies that evaluated barriers which hindered older adults from participating in cancer trials. Twelve articles defined complex, interrelated problems as root causes, including stringent eligibility criteria, physician concern for toxicity, ageism, transportation and caregiver burden.

Only one study implemented an intervention meant to increase enrollment of older adults in trials – and it was not successful. This finding starkly amplifies the lack of effective strategies to improve participation of this underrepresented group in cancer research.

The researchers report that cancer trials must ask appropriate questions tailored or driven by the needs of older adults with cancer and should measure relevant outcomes. Their call to action applies to all oncologists and primary care providers, not just geriatric oncologists, Sedrak said, adding that patients should advocate for themselves.

“Ask your doctor about clinical trial opportunities when you’re diagnosed with cancer and do your own research because there may be an option that you haven’t heard about. It may benefit you, but perhaps your doctor may not have considered you for the investigational trial,” he said.

William Dale, M.D., Ph.D., the study’s senior author and an oncologic geriatrician at City of Hope, said, “We don’t know enough about treating our largest group of cancer patients. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, when enrollment in trials is lower than ever due to isolation and distancing practices, actively including older adults in clinical trials is incredibly important.” Dale is the Arthur M. Coppola Family Chair in Supportive Care Medicine at City of Hope.

City of Hope is a leader in offering older patients appropriate and personalized cancer care, as exemplified by the fact that Dale and his colleagues co-wrote the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s guidelines