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13-Year-Old Gave COVID To 11 Relatives Across 4 States During Family Vacation: CDC

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Nearly a dozen people across four states were infected with the novel coronavirus by a 13-year-old girl during a three-week family vacation over the summer, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The teenager, whose identity remains anonymous, was exposed to COVID-19 during a “large outbreak” in June, leading her to take a coronavirus test four days later. She tested negative and was not showing symptoms at the time, the report states.

But two days later, the teen began experiencing nasal congestion, a symptom of COVID-19, on the same day she, her parents and two brothers traveled to a family gathering at an unconfirmed location, where 14 of them stayed in a five-bedroom, two-bathroom house for between eight and 25 days.

The attendees ranged in age from 9 to 72 and belonged to five households in four states: Rhode Island, Illinois, Georgia and Massachusetts, according to the CDC report.

Six additional relatives (an aunt, an uncle, and four cousins) visited for 13 hours during the trip but maintained social distance and stayed outdoors. None of them tested positive for the virus.

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Including the teenage girl, 12 of the 14 relatives staying at the home – none of whom social distanced or wore masks — began exhibiting COVID-19-related symptoms and were subsequently found to have been infected with the virus.

One of the family members was hospitalized, according to the CDC, while another was treated at an emergency department care for respiratory symptoms. They have both recovered.

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Adeline Fagan, who was in her second year of residency, tested positive for COVID-19 in July

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After the CDC investigated the cases throughout July and August, the 13-year-old girl was determined to be the “index patient” given that she began showing symptoms prior to any other family member that was infected.

The teen’s initial COVID-19 test, done before the trip, was likely a false negative, according to the CDC report, “because it was performed before symptom onset.”

The CDC said that the outbreak further proves that children and adolescents can serve as the source of COVID-19 spreading, even when their symptoms are mild. In addition, it shows that lack of social distancing will likely result in further spreading of the virus, per the CDC.

As of Tuesday, there are over 7.8 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States, while at least 214,900 people have died, according to the New York Times’ database.

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13-year-old holds exercise class to benefit kids’ mental health

As 13-year-old Sadie Feingold prepared for her bat mitzvah project this year, she had one goal in mind: to stop the stigma.

The eighth-grader from Port Washington knew she wanted to focus on mental health for her community service project ahead of her bat mitzvah, or Jewish coming-of-age ceremony. She wanted to encourage kids and teens to talk about mental health struggles and help normalize it.

She said she was inspired to focus on this topic because of her own previous struggles with mental health.

“The whole point was to raise awareness to it and normalize it,” Sadie said.

So after doing some research with her mom about the connection between exercise and children’s mental health, they came up with a plan: She would host an exercise class at their synagogue for local teens and families, and raise money to support the North Shore Child and Family Guidance Center in Roslyn Heights, a mental health agency that treats children and families.

The Guidance Center said her efforts have raised nearly $2,000.

“People don’t really talk about mental health as they do with physical health,” Sadie said. ”I think that some people feel like it’s not important, and I want people to feel like they should be able to talk about their emotions, as they would talk about like how they feel physically.”

The idea originated back in the winter — before the pandemic took hold. She and her mom read a piece in The New York Times that reported how even a moderate amount of exercise in adolescents can raise their endorphin levels, and in turn, help improve their mental health. Endorphins are hormones that promote feelings of natural well-being.

Sadie continued doing research on the topic, and once restrictions lifted and they could congregate outside, her class came together.

They invited family, friends and others to congregate in the parking lot of The Community Synagogue in Port Washington, and on Sept. 13, about 35 kids, teens and adults participated in the 45-minute class of individual exercises, led by a fitness instructor they knew.

They took donations at the class to support the Guidance Center — and encouraged those who couldn’t attend to donate as well. Sadie also gave out T-shirts with “#StopTheStigma” printed on them.

“I think it’s important … that kids feel comfortable, and so they’re not alone in dealing with these issues,” Sadie’s mom Jessica Feingold said. “It’s just something that tons of people deal with now more than ever, and I think it’s important to get that message out there.”

Sadie’s bat mitzvah had been originally scheduled for June, and was postponed to Sept. 26 because of the pandemic. But her mitzvah project only grew in relevance during this period.

Regina Barros-Rivera, associate executive director at the Guidance Center, said their work at the center has become