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Trump’s medical team says he is doing ‘very well’; official warns next 48 hours are ‘critical’

President Trump is “doing very well” and has no difficulty breathing, his medical team said Saturday — although a senior administration official warned that the next 48 hours will be “critical.”

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley and other members of the medical team briefed reporters on Trump’s condition. Conley said they were “extremely happy with the progress” Trump is making.

TRUMP TRANSFERRED TO WALTER REED ‘OUT OF AN ABUNDANCE OF CAUTION’ AFTER TESTING POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS 

“This morning, the president is doing very well,” he said.

However, a senior administration official told Fox News that on Friday morning, Trump was showing troubling signs of a possible progression from mild to more severe form of the disease.

The official said that medical professionals moved quickly and decided to transfer the President to Walter Reed out of an abundance of caution over what was seen as a very concerning trajectory of disease progression.

“Twenty-four hours ago, there was real concern about the President’s vitals,” the official said. “For the past 12 hours, there has been zero concern.”

The official added: “Early indications are for an extremely good prognosis – but the next 48 hours will be critical.”

TRUMP TESTS POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS: HERE’S WHO ELSE IS POSITIVE

At the press conference, Dr. Sean Dooley said that cardiac, kidney and liver functions are all normal, that Trump is not on oxygen and is not having any difficulty breathing or walking.

He quoted Trump as saying: “I feel like I could walk out of here today.” Separately, Dr. Brian Garibaldi described Trump as being in “such great spirits.”

The doctors also said Trump had been fever-free for 24 hours, and that symptoms of a nasal cough and fatigue had all “resolved.” However, they did not give a date for when Trump may leave the center.

Conley reiterated that Trump had received an antibody cocktail, as well as zinc, Vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin. He also said Trump was taking a five day course of Remdesivir.

Conley caused some confusion on Saturday when he said they were “72 hours into the diagnosis,” suggesting that Trump was actually diagnosed on Wednesday. However, he later clarified in a memorandum that he meant to say it was “day three” of the diagnosis — since Trump was diagnosed on Thursday.

Separately, he said that Trump had received the antibody cocktail “48 hours ago” when he meant to say “day two.”

“The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s [sic] antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd,” he said.

Trump announced Friday morning that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive. A number of White House and campaign officials have also tested positive – including senior White House adviser Hope Hicks and Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien. On Saturday former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who was on Trump’s prep team for Tuesday’s presidential debate, announced that he had tested positive.

Trump was moved to

New Mexico reports 298 new coronavirus cases

SANTA FE, N.M. — New Mexico officials have reported 298 additional known COVID-19 cases and three more deaths, increasing the statewide totals to 30,296 cases with 890 deaths. The additional cases reported Saturday included 75 in Bernalillo County, 67 in Dona Ana County, 32 in Chaves County, 22 in Lea County and 20 in Curry County. The three deaths occurred one each in Bernalillo, Curry and Dona Ana counties and involving people in their 70s or 80s with underlying conditions.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— President Trump’s doctors say he’s doing well in hospital, in ‘good spirits’


— Trump’s diagnosis shows US vulnerability to the coronavirus

— India’s COVID-19 fatalities top 100,000, only trail US, Brazil

— Madrid starts first day under a partial lockdown with police controlling travel in and out of the Spanish capital, which has become a coronavirus hotspot.

— The Nobel Prizes show how slow, basic science pays off, even though everyone wants quick fixes to global problems. The Nobels, with new winners announced next week, often concentrate on unheralded and methodical basic science.

— The NFL postponed Sunday’s game between New England and the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs after positive coronavirus tests on both teams.

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Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

PHOENIX — Numerous inmates say Arizona’s prison system has failed to provide necessary testing, supplies and treatment during the coronavirus pandemic. The Arizona Republic reports that dozens of letters from inmates in recent months said the Arizona Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Reentry wasn’t protecting staff and inmates during the outbreak. The Republic reports inmates’ letters describing fears and frustrations, asking for help while others provided graphic details in personal narratives of surviving the virus. A department spokesperson denied many allegations by inmates, including that sick inmates weren’t tested. Department spokesperson Judy Keane also cited health and safety protocols announced during the pandemic.

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LONDON — Britain has recorded 12,872 new coronavirus infections, by far the highest daily total since the outbreak began, though the figure includes a backlog of previously unreported cases.

The government says the figure includes an unspecified number of deaths over the past week that have not been reported because of a now-resolved “technical issue.”

Saturday’s total is more than 5,000 cases more than the previous high, recorded earlier this week.

Britain is seeing a second spike in coronavirus cases, though the daily number can’t directly be compared to the outbreak’s U.K. peak in April because many more tests are now being performed now.

The number of hospitalizations and deaths is also rising but remains far below the U.K.’s springtime peak. Another 49 COVID-19 deaths were reported on Saturday. Britain’s official coronavirus death toll is 42,317.

The government has imposed restrictions on social gatherings to try and curb the spread of the virus, and almost a third of the country’s population of 66 million is under tighter local lockdown measures.

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NEW YORK

The Latest: Trump says he is ‘going to beat’ coronavirus

WASHINGTON — The Latest on coronavirus infections hitting President Donald Trump and others in his circle (all times EDT):

6 p.m.

President Donald Trump has told his longtime friend and sometimes lawyer Rudy Giuliani that he’s “going to beat” the coronavirus.

The New York Post says Trump called Giuliani on Saturday to assure him he’s doing fine following a sobering assessment from the White House chief of staff.

Trump reportedly told Giuliani on the call: “I feel I could get out of here right now. But they’re telling me there can always be a backstep with this disease. But I feel I could go out and do a rally.”

Trump also reportedly explained that he continued to engage in high-risk activity despite the pandemic because he’s the “president of the United States. I can’t lock myself in a room. … I had to confront (the virus) so the American people stopped being afraid of it so we could deal with it responsibly.”

He also said he hopes that by beating the virus he “will be able to show people we can deal with this disease responsibly, but we shouldn’t be afraid of it.”

Trump is being treated around the clock by a team of doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

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5:45 p.m.

Joe Biden says he urged some governors who wanted to endorse his presidential campaign to refrain from doing so because the Trump administration might retaliate by withholding medical supplies critical to COVID-19 relief.

Addressing a virtual town hall of the Amalgamated Transit Union town hall from Wilmington, Delaware, on Saturday, Biden said, “I probably shouldn’t say this.”

“I told some governors, don’t endorse me who wanted to endorse me. Don’t endorse me because you’ll pay a penalty,” Biden said. “You won’t get what you need from the federal government in terms of COVID prep.”

He added: “Not a joke, my word.”

Biden’s campaign has drawn the support of some leading Republicans who have broken ranks against their own party and President Donald Trump.

Asked what he would do differently in handling the coronavirus pandemic than Trump, Biden responded, “I don’t want to be attacking the president and the first lady now because they now have contracted the coronavirus.”

“Jill and I pray for their quick and full recovery,” he added, referring to his wife, Jill.

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5:30 p.m.

With President Donald Trump in the hospital, his campaign is launching an effort it’s calling “Operation MAGA” to maintain momentum.

The operation entails “a full marshalling of top-level surrogates, campaign coalitions and Trump supporters” to carry the campaign until Trump can return to the trail, according to a campaign statement. Vice President Mike Pence and Trump’s family will be prime players in the effort, which will feature a series of online events leading up to Wednesday’s vice presidential debate before moving to in-person events.

It’s unclear how the new plan differs from the campaign’s operations before Trump was hospitalized. Pence and the first family was already actively

An ‘exhausted’ Trump’s long path to coronavirus

When President Donald Trump stepped into the dining room of his golf club in New Jersey on Thursday, high-dollar attendees gathered for a fundraiser there thought he seemed a little off.



a man wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump step off Air Force One upon arrival at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland, Ohio on September 29, 2020. - President Trump is in Cleveland, Ohio for the first of three presidential debates.


© Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump step off Air Force One upon arrival at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland, Ohio on September 29, 2020. – President Trump is in Cleveland, Ohio for the first of three presidential debates.

Subdued from a week of campaigning, maybe. Hoarse from a string of large rallies. Perhaps a little pale underneath the crystal chandeliers.

“Exhausted,” described one person who saw him.

Little could those guests know that the tired-sounding man sitting across the white brocade tablecloth would test positive, hours later, for coronavirus.

Nor were they aware that before he arrived, both Trump and his senior aides received information suggesting he could have been exposed — and therefore could be contagious. Like usual, the President wasn’t wearing a mask.

Trump’s positive diagnosis, announced in a tweet during the small hours on Friday morning only after word leaked his top aide Hope Hicks had become infected, has thrown the nation’s leadership into tumult and sent the capital scrambling to determine who else might be infected.

Questions of government continuity arose in ways they haven’t in years; Trump’s diagnosis amounted to the most serious health threat to an American president since the non-fatal shooting of President Ronald Reagan in 1981.

Suffering only “mild” symptoms, according to the White House — which include a fever, a person familiar with the matter said — Trump alternated Friday between upbeat entreaties to aides to go about business as usual and more worried-sounding brooding about his health, according to a person familiar with the matter. He canceled all of his upcoming campaign travel and failed to appear for a scheduled phone call midday with state and local officials to discuss the impact of the pandemic on vulnerable senior citizens.

“I know many of you were expecting to hear from President Trump today, but as I’m sure you are all aware, President Trump and the first lady tested positive for Covid-19,” Vice President Mike Pence, acting in his stead, told the officials.

In a memo Friday afternoon, Trump’s physician wrote that he “remains fatigued but in good spirits.” He said Trump had been administered a Regeneron polyclonal antibody cocktail and has been taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin. The decision to give Trump an experimental monoclonal antibody cocktail is a sign of how concerned the White House may be by the diagnosis, Dr. Jonathan Reiner, a CNN medical analyst and professor at George Washington University, said.

The story of how Trump contracted coronavirus was still being learned on Friday as aides hurriedly tried to trace who he’d been in contact with and whether they themselves might be contagious. At 74-years-old, clinically obese and with known heart ailments, Trump himself fits within a high-risk category.

Yet taken in

Chris Christie hospitalized with ‘mild’ virus symptoms

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tweeted Saturday that he’s checked himself into a hospital, hours after he announced he had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Christie said that after consulting with his doctors, he went to Morristown Medical Center on Saturday afternoon. He said he’s only experiencing mild symptoms.

“Due to my history of asthma, we decided this is an important precautionary measure,” he tweeted.

Christie, who has publicly struggled with his weight, is the latest in a string of virus cases connected to President Donald Trump’s inner circle.


Trump’s former 2016 rival told The Associated Press on Friday that the last time he was with the president was Tuesday in Cleveland during preparations for his debate with former Vice President Joe Biden. Christie had tweeted Friday morning that he had last tested negative ahead of Tuesday’s debate and was not having any symptoms then.

In 2013, during Christie’s first term as New Jersey governor, he underwent lap-band surgery and lost a significant amount of weight. Two years before that, he was hospitalized for difficulty breathing. The 58-year-old uses an inhaler.

He once called himself “the healthiest fat guy you’ve ever seen.”

Text messages were left seeking comment from Christie early Saturday evening.

In addition to Trump and first lady Melania Trump, multiple people who have traveled with the president or attended events with him over the last several days have contracted the virus.

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New Coronavirus Cases Top 1K In Virginia For 1st Time In 2 Weeks

VIRGINIA — The Virginia Department of Health reported 1,116 new cases of the coronavirus on Saturday, up from the 966 cases reported Friday. The new cases bring the cumulative case total in the state to 150,803.

The daily increase topped 1,000 cases for the first time since Sept. 18 when 1,242 new cases were reported. State health officials also reported a cumulative total of 11,191 hospitalization since the start of the pandemic and 3,270 deaths, an increase of 20 deaths since Friday.

The breakdown of new cases by region as of Saturday was 283 in the southwest region, 260 in the central region, 221 in the northern region, 187 in the northwest region and 165 in the eastern region. The seven-day average of new cases across Virginia is now 771.

The positive average of PCR tests remains at 4.7 percent, below the 5 percent rate recommended by the World Health Organization before reopening. The total of PCR tests completed in Virginia stands at 2,113,878, up 19,517 from Friday.

Four regions have averages below 5 percent — the northern region with 4.2 percent, the central region with 4.3 percent, the eastern region with 4.6 percent and the northwest region with 4.8 percent. The southwest region has an average above the statewide average — 6.0 percent.

Hospitalizations of COVID-19 patients stand at 906 statewide on Saturday. The breakdown of hospital patients by region is 239 in the central region, 208 in the northern region, 198 in the eastern region, 168 in the southwest region, and 93 in the northwest region.

The current hospitalizations, as of Saturday, include 191 in the intensive care units and 103 on ventilators, according to the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association. Ventilator use stands at 21 percent among all Virginia patients, and ICU occupancy remains at 80 percent. There are no hospitals reporting difficulty obtaining personal protective equipment in the next 72 hours.

Virginia residents in the 20-29 age group have the greatest number of positive tests, at 131,370 cases, or 20.1 percent of the state total. People older than 80 represent the highest number of deaths, at 1,566 people, or 47.9 percent of the number of Virginians who have died from COVID-19.

Here are the latest coronavirus data updates for our coverage area between Friday and Saturday:

  • Alexandria: 3,893 cases, 326 hospitalizations, 70 deaths; increase of 20 cases and one death

  • Arlington County: 4,026 cases, 505 hospitalizations, 151 deaths; increase of 17 cases and two hospitalizations

  • Fairfax County: 21,176 cases, 2,176 hospitalizations, 590 deaths; increase of 112 cases and seven hospitalizations

  • Fairfax City: 137 cases, 14 hospitalizations, eight deaths; no changes

  • Falls Church: 72 cases, 13 hospitalizations, seven deaths; increase of one case

  • Loudoun County: 6,954 cases, 437 hospitalizations, 126 deaths; increase of 38 cases and one hospitalization

  • Manassas: 1,936 cases, 130 hospitalizations, 24 deaths; increase of six cases

  • Manassas Park: 613 cases, 55 hospitalizations, eight deaths; no changes

  • Prince William County: 12,667 cases, 923 hospitalizations, 209 deaths; increase of 27 cases, and one hospitalization;

What to Know About Sean Conley, the White House Physician

As President Trump remains hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for the coronavirus, one doctor is at the center of his treatment: Sean P. Conley, the White House physician.

Stepping out of the hospital with a team of doctors behind him on Saturday, Dr. Conley gave an optimistic update on Mr. Trump’s condition at a news conference. He said the president was “doing very well” and in “exceptionally good spirits” after spending Friday night at the hospital.

The news conference put a national spotlight on Dr. Conley, who offered a distinctly different outlook from what Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, told reporters later.

Here’s what we know about Dr. Conley.

Dr. Conley took on the role of White House physician in 2018 after Dr. Ronny L. Jackson was nominated to be secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. Jackson had to withdraw his name from consideration for that post amid accusations of inappropriate workplace behavior and was subsequently promoted by Mr. Trump to the position of assistant to the president and chief White House medical adviser. He is now running for a House seat in Texas.

In March 2018, Dr. Conley was named acting White House physician, and he was officially appointed to the position by Mr. Trump in May 2018.

Dr. Conley graduated from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2006, according to records from the Virginia Board of Medicine. Doctors of osteopathic medicine tend to emphasize community medicine and preventive care, take a more holistic approach to medicine and rely heavily on physical diagnosis compared with traditional doctors of medicine.

Dr. Conley, who received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Notre Dame, has served as an emergency doctor for the U.S. Navy since 2006.

A native of Pennsylvania, Dr. Conley completed his residency at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., in 2013. After his residency, Dr. Conley served as chief of trauma for the NATO Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit in Afghanistan.

He served as director of the medical center’s Combat Trauma Research Group for a little over two years.

In May, Dr. Conley gained attention after revealing that Mr. Trump had started taking hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malaria drug, while under his care.

Many experts have questioned the drug’s effectiveness in treating, preventing or curing Covid-19 despite claims from Mr. Trump.

The Food and Drug Administration warned in April that it should be used only in clinical trials or in hospitals. The agency also said the drug could cause dangerous heart rhythm problems.

In a letter in May discussing Mr. Trump’s use of hydroxychloroquine, Dr. Conley said he and the president had “concluded the potential benefit from treatment outweighed the relative risks.”

At the news conference on Saturday, Dr. Conley told reporters that Mr. Trump was not taking hydroxychloroquine.

“We discussed it,” Dr. Conley said. “He

Trump taking Regeneron drug, Remdesivir therapy for coronavirus diagnosis: ex-WH doctor explains

President Trump is taking experimental coronavirus drugs Remdesivir and a Regeneron drug after being diagnosed with COVID-19 this week, his former White House physician told “Fox & Friends Weekend.”

“The two of those in combination should help clear the virus out of his body much sooner than his body could do it on its own,” Dr. Ronny Jackson said Saturday morning.

TRUMP TWEETS FROM HOSPITAL AS DOC CONFIRMS REMDESIVIR TREATMENT: ‘GOING WELL, I THINK!’

The president was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center “out of an abundance of caution” Friday night and is being treated with experimental drugs in response to a compassionate use request.

“The Regeneron product [known as Regeneron-Covid 2 or REGN-COV2] is an antibody product,” Trump’s former doctor explained.

“They found two particular antibodies in the research they did coming up to developing this product. One of them attaches to the spiked protein and prevents the virus from entering into the host cell, the human cell. So what it does basically is it attaches itself to the virus and it disables the virus where it can’t get into the body, into the cells of the body and cause infection, and so that essentially drops the viral count,” he said. “Eventually your body clears those viruses.”

REGENERON IS TRUMP’S COVID-19 TREATMENT: WHAT TO KNOW

The other drug, Remdesivir, he explained, stops viral replication: “So we’re blocking the virus that’s already in his body and we’re preventing the replication of the virus with the Remdesivir,” he said.

Jackson, who helped design and build the presidential wing at Walter Reed, predicts that Trump will spend three to four days there.

“I think they’ll monitor him and check to make sure the fever is not getting worse and that his symptoms are improving. After a couple of days, I think he will be back to the White House,” he said.

Prior to moving to Walter Reed, on Friday afternoon, Dr. Sean P. Conley, the president’s physician, released an update on the president’s condition.

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“Following PCR-confirmation of the president’s diagnosis, as a precautionary measure he received a single 8-gram dose of Regeneron’s polyclonal antibody cocktail,” a memo released Friday afternoon by Dr. Sean P. Conley, the president’s physician stated. “He completed the infusion without incident.”

“In addition to the polyclonal antibodies, the president has been taking zinc, Vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin,” Conley said.

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India’s coronavirus death toll passes 100,000 with no sign of an end

BENGALURU/NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India’s death toll from the novel coronavirus rose past 100,000 on Saturday, only the third country in the world to reach that bleak milestone, after the United States and Brazil, and its epidemic shows no sign of abating.

Total deaths rose to 100,842, the health ministry said, while the tally of infections climbed to 6.47 million after a daily increase in cases of 79,476. India now has the highest rate of daily increase in infections in the world.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government, faced with a collapsing economy after imposing a tough lockdown to try to stem the spread of the virus in late March, is pushing ahead with a full opening of the country.

Cinemas were allowed to re-open at half capacity this week and authorities can decide to re-open schools from the middle of this month.

Heading into winter and the holiday season, including the Hindu festival of Diwali next month, the world’s second most populous country could see a jump in cases, health experts said.

“We have seen some recent slowdown of the virus curve but this may be a local peak, there may be another coming,” said Bhramar Mukherjee, a professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Michigan.

She said data showed a little over 7% of the population of 1.3 billion had been exposed to the virus, meaning India was still far from any sort of herd immunity.

The number of cases could rise to 12.2 million by the end of the year but the rate of spread would depend on how effective measures such as social distancing were, she said.

“So it will continue like a slow burning coil, that is my hope, and we have to play the long game to stop it from being a wildfire.”

GRAPHIC: Covid-19 cases vs recoveries: India, Brazil and U.S. –

DATA QUESTIONED

The United States, Brazil and India together account for nearly 45% of all COVID-19 deaths globally.

Death rates in India, however, have been significantly lower than in those other two countries, raising questions about the accuracy of its data.

India has, on average, less than one death from the disease for every 10,000 people while the United States and Brazil have seen six deaths per 10,000.

U.S. President Donald Trump, defending his administration’s handling of the pandemic in this week’s presidential debate, said countries such as India were under-reporting deaths.

Shashank Tripathi, of the Centre for Infectious Disease Research at the Indian Institute of Science in Bengaluru, acknowledged there could be problems with the data though India’s young population might help explain the lower death rate.

“In India, even without a pandemic, all deaths are not properly registered,” Tripathi said.

“I’m not very confident that the mortality rates reflect the right numbers, though the younger demographic has given us some advantage.”

Representatives of the health ministry and the Indian Council of Medical Research did not immediately respond to calls or emails for

A woman in Australia discovered her headaches were caused by tapeworm larvae in her brain

The aches were caused by tapeworm larvae that had taken up space in her brain, according to a new study on her case by the The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene published on September 21.

The woman, who never traveled overseas, is the first native case of the disease in Australia, the study said. Previous Australian cases of this infection were from immigrants or returning residents who traveled to regions where the disease is endemic to, such as Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

For the past seven years, the woman complained of headaches that would occur two- or three-times a month and went away with prescribed migraine medication. However, her latest headache lasted for more than a week and came with more severe visual symptoms, including the blurring of her central vision.

Disinfecting the Texas water supply from a brain-eating amoeba could take months, officials say

An MRI of her brain led doctors to believe that a tumor might be the cause of her pain, but after operating and removing the lesion, they discovered it was actually a cyst full of tapeworm larvae. After the removal, she required no further treatment.

This condition is known as neurocysticercosis, which can cause neurological symptoms when larval cysts develop in the brain. People who get the parasitic infection do so by swallowing eggs found in the feces of a person who has an intestinal tapeworm, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Neurocysticercosis is deadly, and a leading cause of adult onset epilepsy worldwide, the CDC said.

Tapeworms typically take up residence in human’s intestines, an infection known as taeniasis, and some can pass on their own without medication. The parasite is commonly transmitted when people consume undercooked pork — pigs are often intermediary tapeworm hosts — or come in contact with food, water and soil contaminated with tapeworm eggs.

The woman, who worked as a barista, was considered to be at no or very low risk of infection with tapeworm larvae but is believed to have somehow accidentally ingested tapeworm eggs released from a carrier.

A man from Texas had a similar experience, suffering from splitting headaches for more than a decade that turned out to be caused by tapeworm larvae that became lodged in his brain’s fourth ventricle.

The best line of defense against similar infection is cooking meat to safe temperatures, washing your hands with soap before eating and only eating food you can ensure was cooked in sanitary conditions.

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